American Apparel

Select projects during my time at American Apparel as a front-end developer

Role
Front-End Developer
Tools
HTML, CSS, Javascript
Duration
2009—2011
Team
Charles DeLauder, Director of Solutions Architecture
Raz Schiønning, Director of eCommerce
Lisa Kim, Project Manager
Suzanne Dixon, UX Designer
Erik Homsapaya, Senior Designer
April Marquet, Senior Designer
Matthew Penkala, Senior Designer
Overview
My responsibilities while working at American Apparel included  developing and testing multiple emails a day, updating and adding new  features to American Apparel’s 17 online stores (each in a different  language) and intranet, to experimenting with building a mobile version  of the site–pre-responsive/mobile app days!

American Apparel mobile website

American Apparel mobile website screens
American Apparel mobile website checkout screens
American Apparel mobile website order details screens
American Apparel mobile website PDP and PLP screens

From 2009-2011, mobile web and apps were beginning to come to fruition especially with the release of iPhone and Android.

The team consisted of the Director of Web, who designed the mobile  interface and flows, and a project manager. My role in this big  undertaking was front-end developer and I was responsible in bringing  the designs to function.

At the time there were limited resources on where to find information in creating and building a mobile website (before responsive was even  a thing). I set my sights and began my research delving onto any possible resource I could find.

What I found was in order to build a mobile website one had to create  a set of separate files in your desired fixed width and height and  place a specific piece of code in your Javascript file to point and  redirect the user to the mobile website; and this was for iOS only!

For Android, the circumstances were a bit more complicated (at the  time). I downloaded Eclipse and loaded an APK in order to run and test  my code.

20 Styles x 20 Looks

20 Styles x 20 Looks was a campaign in which users can select from multiple items, for both men and women, and seeing them put together on a model. Hovering over a clothing item on the model displays the product to buy displaying description, price, color, and size. In addition to displaying product on hover, items to left of model are also highlighted.                  

20 Styles x 20 Looks for women
20 Styles x 20 Looks for men

American Apparel Factory Tour

American Apparel put together a multi-regional campaign showcasing  life inside the factory. Users would be able to hover over the large  image of American Apparel’s factory or navigate by drop down menu below  to watch video stories of employees and departments giving a more  intimate look.

Languages include: French, Spanish, German, Japanese, Korean, and English.                

American Apparel Factory Tour animated gif showing the different floors being highlighted